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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jul 10, 2011 7:15pm EDT
in prison for his opinions. someone else who also led to jail was britain's greatest investigative journalist if you have read king leopold's goes to will remember him as the man who exposed the brutalities of the king leopold congo and his term was extremely harsh and he died not long after words really as a result. a very brave man. war opponents like this were up against the unceasing verizon of propaganda. here is the u.s. army recruiting poster from the period, a typical of things you saw on both sides. a german poster, with god 14 and fatherland. a poster warning against for heaven's sake say potential german invasion of australia. some of the probe for propaganda has an edge to it. you would be letting down the when and if you did not fight. or perhaps you were all blimp evading your responsibility and worse yet if you refuse to fight maybe you were a feminist. there was a nasty edge to the patriotic fervor in the air. as i mentioned, there were more resistors in all the countries we were fighting, but for various reasons the sharpest conflict between those who thought the w
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 10:30pm EDT
in today. these are officer cadets at britain's most exclusive private school drilling in 1915. now, one of the things about the wars that we have gotten accustomed to in this country in recent years, vietnam, iraq, and the stand is that they are fox mostly by the poor. they are are very very few among the dead and wounded in those three wars who have been sons or daughters off ceos, senators, members of congress, anything like that. it was the exact opposite and the first world war. the death toll actually fell proportionately higher on the upper classes. and the main reason for that was that it was customary for sons of the upper classes, sons of the aristocracy, to have military careers. and i think a major reason for this is that armies are not only there to fight wars against other countries. they are there to maintain order at home. the 19th century was a very tumultuous time in europe, so was the early 20th century. many of the european armies were used to break strikes or the british army you know, put down tenant farmer rebellions in ireland, and so therefore officer in the army
CSPAN
Jul 2, 2011 9:00pm EDT
concept and that they were always right and an essential key and was the idea because britain and germany were both races, they would not go to war. it's an absurdity on so many levels, but he himself served in the trenches in the great war when they helped one another, but nonetheless, when the second world war broke out, there were 46 operational u boats with the united kingdom. by the end of the war, there were 463, most bottled up in the baltic, but if he started the world war with as many boats as he finished it, he would have been able to strangle the united kingdom, and the clans to invade the united king doll, many of which were not agreed up until september 1940 when really they ought to have been put into place when they came into power in 1933. one appreciates how little he was expected to have to attack. there is the infamous list of 2,820 britains who would be shot on sight by the ss when the germans successfully invaded. in that list you see sigmund freud and huxley who came to live in america in 1936, and there were others of that kind. indeed, when rebecca west and nick ho
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2011 10:00am EDT
that because britain and germany were both anglo-saxon races, that they as aryans would not go to war with one another. it's an absurdity, needless to say, on so many levels. he, himself, had served in the trenches in the great war when they helped one another. but nonetheless, by the time the second world war broke out, there were only 46 operational u-boats against the united kingdom because he didn't believe he would ever have to actually fight the united kingdom. by the end of the war there were 463, most of them bottled up in the atlantic. but if he had started with as many as he finished with, he would have been able to strangle the united king kingdom. and when one looks at the plans to invade the united kingdom, many of which weren't agreed up until september 1940 when really they ought to have been put in place as soon as he came to power in january 1933, one appreciates how little he was expected to have to attack. there is the infamous list of 2,820 brick britons who were going to be shot on sight or at least when they were arrested by is the ss when the germans successfully invaded
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 7:00am EDT
was always right. and an essential key, as with the idea that because britain and germany were both anglo-saxon races, that they would not go to work with one another. it's an absurdity needless to say until may levels, but basically because he himself had served in the trenches in the great war when they had fought one another. nonetheless, by the time to second world war broke out their only 46 operational u-boats against the united kingdom because he didn't believe he would ever ask have to fight the united kingdom by the end of the war through 463, most of them bottled up in the baltic. but if you start the second world war with as many u-boats as the fish would've been able to have strangled the united kingdom. and when one looks at the plans to invade the united kingdom, many of which were not even a great into september 1940, when really they should have been put in place since he came to power in january 1933. one appreciates how little he was expecting to have to attack. there is the infamous -- the list of 2820 britons who are going to be shot on sight, or at least when they wer
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 2:00pm EDT
of collapse, and it will not collapse. it is very much like britain and rome. if you look at the realms beaches in the senate, just before the empire, use the absolute predictions of catastrophe. that happened to. >> host: okay, so 10 years so now we'll come back and have this conversation. we will see how it worked out. >> guest: it will be the same conversation. >> host: thank you so much. it's been a great conversation today. >> guest: i enjoyed it. >> that was "after words," booktv signature program in which authors of latest nonfiction books are in the by journalists, public policymakers, legislators and others familiar with the material. "after words" airs every weekend on booktv at 10 p.m. on saturday, 12 and 9 p.m. on sunday and 12 a.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click on "after words" in the booktv series on the upper right side of the page. >> up next on booktv, investigative reporter annie jacobsen presents the history of the military base, area 51, which is located in the nevada desert. the author use of recently declassified doc
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2011 8:00pm EDT
it was authoritarianism, racism, eugenics, imperialism and outside of france and the united states and britain and a couple of constitutional monarchies and scandinavia you've got rise of authoritarianism three terrapin in the depression obviously in hitler's terminally and miscellany italy but elsewhere, and i do think there is a link that is when you have slow growth you might think everyone will say let's pitch in together and save the nation, but it's not just here, it's most democracies we've had the experience. the horizons contract and the group's, whatever they may be you want to hang on to what you have and the fear that someone else will do better than you and shrinking the economy tends to power politics and its very frightening. >> it's a sort of zero some mentality. bill, to one to that anything? >> we didn't like one another when things were going good. [laughter] and that's because politics now is not based on class trips, it's lifestyle groups and so those relationships have broken. >> i would say the lack of cohesion that i think about is not a function of the economy as much
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)